Defendants’ program consists of a series of tiered membership levels, each with a membership fee higher than the last. Defendants pay a consumer only when the consumer recruits new consumers to join the program, through commissions on the new consumers’ membership fees. Although Defendants’ program ostensibly provides business coaching that will help members build a successful business, the goal of that “coaching” is to persuade the member to purchase a higher membership tier. – Source FTC
To a super affiliate owning a good email list a guarantee of having good income. Yes, you can make sales off of your blog and when you speak at conferences, but these have far lower response rates. It’s easy to put your blog URL and Twitter handle on a convention projection screen and use you blog to gain followers. Then use the blog to encourage email sign-ups. Once you have somebody’s email address, each blog posts primes the pump, especially insider ideas and success stories. Readers expect super affiliates to sell in most posts, so when you don’t, ironically, you can come across as being more genuine. That builds trust which puts readers at ease about giving you their email.
Marketing emails need to be personalized to the reader and filled with interesting graphics. Few people want to read emails that are addressed "Dear Sir/Madam" -- as opposed to their first or last name -- and even fewer people want to read an email that simply gives them a wall of text. Visuals help your recipients quickly understand what the point of the email is.

Take the email below from Paperless Post, for example. I love the header of this email: It provides a clear CTA that includes a sense of urgency. Then, the subheader asks a question that forces recipients to think to themselves, "Wait, when is Mother's Day again? Did I buy Mom a card?" Below this copy, the simple grid design is both easy to scan and quite visually appealing. Each card picture is a CTA in and of itself -- click on any one of them, and you'll be taken to a purchase page. 
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